Boost C++ Libraries

...one of the most highly regarded and expertly designed C++ library projects in the world. Herb Sutter and Andrei Alexandrescu, C++ Coding Standards

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Builtin tools

Boost.Build comes with support for a large number of C++ compilers, and other tools. This section documents how to use those tools.

Before using any tool, you must declare your intention, and possibly specify additional information about the tool's configuration. This is done by calling the using rule, typically in your user-config.jam, for example:

using gcc ;

additional parameters can be passed just like for other rules, for example:

using gcc : 4.0 : g++-4.0 ;

The options that can be passed to each tool are documented in the subsequent sections.

C++ Compilers

This section lists all Boost.Build modules that support C++ compilers and documents how each one can be initialized. The name of support module for compiler is also the value for the toolset feature that can be used to explicitly request that compiler.

GNU C++

The gcc module supports the GNU C++ compiler on Linux, a number of Unix-like system including SunOS and on Windows (either Cygwin or MinGW). On Mac OSX, it is recommended to use system gcc, see the section called “Apple Darwin gcc”.

The gcc module is initialized using the following syntax:

using gcc : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the version is not explicitly specified, it will be automatically detected by running the compiler with the -v option. If the command is not specified, the g++ binary will be searched in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

root

Specifies root directory of the compiler installation. This option is necessary only if it is not possible to detect this information from the compiler command—for example if the specified compiler command is a user script.

rc

Specifies the resource compiler command that will be used with the version of gcc that is being configured. This setting makes sense only for Windows and only if you plan to use resource files. By default windres will be used.

rc-type

Specifies the type of resource compiler. The value can be either windres for msvc resource compiler, or rc for borland's resource compiler.

In order to compile 64-bit applications, you have to specify address-model=64, and the instruction-set feature should refer to a 64 bit processor. Currently, those include nocona, opteron, athlon64 and athlon-fx.

Apple Darwin gcc

The darwin module supports the version of gcc that is modified and provided by Apple. The configuration is essentially identical to that of the gcc module.

The darwin toolset can generate so called "fat" binaries—binaries that can run support more than one architecture, or address mode. To build a binary that can run both on Intel and PowerPC processors, specify architecture=combined. To build a binary that can run both in 32-bit and 64-bit modes, specify address-model=32_64. If you specify both of those properties, a "4-way" fat binary will be generated.

Microsoft Visual C++

The msvc module supports the Microsoft Visual C++ command-line tools on Microsoft Windows. The supported products and versions of command line tools are listed below:

  • Visual Studio 2010—10.0

  • Visual Studio 2008—9.0

  • Visual Studio 2005—8.0

  • Visual Studio .NET 2003—7.1

  • Visual Studio .NET—7.0

  • Visual Studio 6.0, Service Pack 5—6.5

The msvc module is initialized using the following syntax:

using msvc : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;
          

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the version is not explicitly specified, the most recent version found in the registry will be used instead. If the special value all is passed as the version, all versions found in the registry will be configured. If a version is specified, but the command is not, the compiler binary will be searched in standard installation paths for that version, followed by PATH.

The compiler command should be specified using forward slashes, and quoted.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

assembler

The command that compiles assembler sources. If not specified, ml will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

compiler

The command that compiles C and C++ sources. If not specified, cl will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

compiler-filter

Command through which to pipe the output of running the compiler. For example to pass the output to STLfilt.

idl-compiler

The command that compiles Microsoft COM interface definition files. If not specified, midl will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

linker

The command that links executables and dynamic libraries. If not specified, link will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

mc-compiler

The command that compiles Microsoft message catalog files. If not specified, mc will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

resource-compiler

The command that compiles resource files. If not specified, rc will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

setup

The filename of the global environment setup script to run before invoking any of the tools defined in this toolset. Will not be used in case a target platform specific script has been explicitly specified for the current target platform. Used setup script will be passed the target platform identifier (x86, x86_amd64, x86_ia64, amd64 or ia64) as a arameter. If not specified a default script is chosen based on the used compiler binary, e.g. vcvars32.bat or vsvars32.bat.

setup-amd64, setup-i386, setup-ia64

The filename of the target platform specific environment setup script to run before invoking any of the tools defined in this toolset. If not specified the global environment setup script is used.

64-bit support

Starting with version 8.0, Microsoft Visual Studio can generate binaries for 64-bit processor, both 64-bit flavours of x86 (codenamed AMD64/EM64T), and Itanium (codenamed IA64). In addition, compilers that are itself run in 64-bit mode, for better performance, are provided. The complete list of compiler configurations are as follows (we abbreviate AMD64/EM64T to just AMD64):

  • 32-bit x86 host, 32-bit x86 target

  • 32-bit x86 host, 64-bit AMD64 target

  • 32-bit x86 host, 64-bit IA64 target

  • 64-bit AMD64 host, 64-bit AMD64 target

  • 64-bit IA64 host, 64-bit IA64 target

The 32-bit host compilers can be always used, even on 64-bit Windows. On the contrary, 64-bit host compilers require both 64-bit host processor and 64-bit Windows, but can be faster. By default, only 32-bit host, 32-bit target compiler is installed, and additional compilers need to be installed explicitly.

To use 64-bit compilation you should:

  1. Configure you compiler as usual. If you provide a path to the compiler explicitly, provide the path to the 32-bit compiler. If you try to specify the path to any of 64-bit compilers, configuration will not work.

  2. When compiling, use address-model=64, to generate AMD64 code.

  3. To generate IA64 code, use architecture=ia64

The (AMD64 host, AMD64 target) compiler will be used automatically when you are generating AMD64 code and are running 64-bit Windows on AMD64. The (IA64 host, IA64 target) compiler will never be used, since nobody has an IA64 machine to test.

It is believed that AMD64 and EM64T targets are essentially compatible. The compiler options /favor:AMD64 and /favor:EM64T, which are accepted only by AMD64 targeting compilers, cause the generated code to be tuned to a specific flavor of 64-bit x86. Boost.Build will make use of those options depending on the value of theinstruction-set feature.

Intel C++

The intel-linux and intel-win modules support the Intel C++ command-line compiler—the Linux and Windows versions respectively.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using intel-linux : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

or

using intel-win : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

respectively.

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If compiler command is not specified, then Boost.Build will look in PATH for an executable icpc (on Linux), or icc.exe (on Windows).

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

The Linux version supports the following additional options:

root

Specifies root directory of the compiler installation. This option is necessary only if it is not possible to detect this information from the compiler command—for example if the specified compiler command is a user script.

HP aC++ compiler

The acc module supports the HP aC++ compiler for the HP-UX operating system.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using acc : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the command is not specified, the aCC binary will be searched in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

Borland C++ Compiler

The borland module supports the command line C++ compiler included in C++ Builder 2006 product and earlier version of it, running on Microsoft Windows.

The supported products are listed below. The version reported by the command lines tools is also listed for reference.:

  • C++ Builder 2006—5.8.2

  • CBuilderX—5.6.5, 5.6.4 (depending on release)

  • CBuilder6—5.6.4

  • Free command line tools—5.5.1

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using borland : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the command is not specified, Boost.Build will search for a binary named bcc32 in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

Comeau C/C++ Compiler

The como-linux and the como-win modules supports the Comeau C/C++ Compiler on Linux and Windows respectively.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using como-linux : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the command is not specified, Boost.Build will search for a binary named como in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

Before using the Windows version of the compiler, you need to setup necessary environment variables per compiler's documentation. In particular, the COMO_XXX_INCLUDE variable should be set, where XXX corresponds to the used backend C compiler.

Code Warrior

The cw module support CodeWarrior compiler, originally produced by Metrowerks and presently developed by Freescale. Boost.Build supports only the versions of the compiler that target x86 processors. All such versions were released by Metrowerks before aquisition and are not sold any longer. The last version known to work is 9.4.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using cw : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the command is not specified, Boost.Build will search for a binary named mwcc in default installation paths and in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

root

Specifies root directory of the compiler installation. This option is necessary only if it is not possible to detect this information from the compiler command—for example if the specified compiler command is a user script.

setup

The command that sets up environment variables prior to invoking the compiler. If not specified, cwenv.bat alongside the compiler binary will be used.

compiler

The command that compiles C and C++ sources. If not specified, mwcc will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

linker

The command that links executables and dynamic libraries. If not specified, mwld will be used. The command will be invoked after the setup script was executed and adjusted the PATH variable.

Digital Mars C/C++ Compiler

The dmc module supports the Digital Mars C++ compiler.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using dmc : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the command is not specified, Boost.Build will search for a binary named dmc in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

HP C++ Compiler for Tru64 Unix

The hp_cxx modules supports the HP C++ Compiler for Tru64 Unix.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using hp_cxx : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the command is not specified, Boost.Build will search for a binary named hp_cxx in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

Sun Studio

The sun module supports the Sun Studio C++ compilers for the Solaris OS.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using sun : [version] : [c++-compile-command] : [compiler options] ;

This statement may be repeated several times, if you want to configure several versions of the compiler.

If the command is not specified, Boost.Build will search for a binary named CC in /opt/SUNWspro/bin and in PATH.

When using this compiler on complex C++ code, such as the Boost C++ library, it is recommended to specify the following options when intializing the sun module:

-library=stlport4 -features=tmplife -features=tmplrefstatic
          

See the Sun C++ Frontend Tales for details.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

cflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C sources.

cxxflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling C++ sources.

compileflags

Specifies additional compiler flags that will be used when compiling both C and C++ sources.

linkflags

Specifies additional command line options that will be passed to the linker.

Starting with Sun Studio 12, you can create 64-bit applications by using the address-model=64 property.

IBM Visual Age

The vacpp module supports the IBM Visual Age C++ Compiler, for the AIX operating system. Versions 7.1 and 8.0 are known to work.

The module is initialized using the following syntax:

using vacpp ;

The module does not accept any initialization options. The compiler should be installed in the /usr/vacpp/bin directory.

Later versions of Visual Age are known as XL C/C++. They were not tested with the the vacpp module.

Third-party libraries

Boost.Build provides special support for some third-party C++ libraries, documented below.

STLport library

The STLport library is an alternative implementation of C++ runtime library. Boost.Build supports using that library on Windows platfrom. Linux is hampered by different naming of libraries in each STLport version and is not officially supported.

Before using STLport, you need to configure it in user-config.jam using the following syntax:

using stlport : [version] : header-path : [library-path] ;

Where version is the version of STLport, for example 5.1.4, headers is the location where STLport headers can be found, and libraries is the location where STLport libraries can be found. The version should always be provided, and the library path should be provided if you're using STLport's implementation of iostreams. Note that STLport 5.* always uses its own iostream implementation, so the library path is required.

When STLport is configured, you can build with STLport by requesting stdlib=stlport on the command line.

zlib

Provides support for the zlib library. zlib can be configured either to use precompiled binaries or to build the library from source.

zlib can be initialized using the following syntax

using zlib : [version] : [options] : [condition] : [is-default] ;
          

Options for using a prebuilt library:

search

The directory containing the zlib binaries.

name

Overrides the default library name.

include

The directory containing the zlib headers.

If none of these options is specified, then the environmental variables ZLIB_LIBRARY_PATH, ZLIB_NAME, and ZLIB_INCLUDE will be used instead.

Options for building zlib from source:

source

The zlib source directory. Defaults to the environmental variable ZLIB_SOURCE.

tag

Sets the tag property to adjust the file name of the library. Ignored when using precompiled binaries.

build-name

The base name to use for the compiled library. Ignored when using precompiled binaries.

Examples:

# Find zlib in the default system location
using zlib ;
# Build zlib from source
using zlib : 1.2.7 : <source>/home/steven/zlib-1.2.7 ;
# Find zlib in /usr/local
using zlib : 1.2.7 : <include>/usr/local/include <search>/usr/local/lib ;
# Build zlib from source for msvc and find
# prebuilt binaries for gcc.
using zlib : 1.2.7 : <source>C:/Devel/src/zlib-1.2.7 : <toolset>msvc ;
using zlib : 1.2.7 : : <toolset>gcc ;

Documentation tools

Boost.Build support for the Boost documentation tools is documented below.

xsltproc

To use xsltproc, you first need to configure it using the following syntax:

using xsltproc : [xsltproc] ;

Where xsltproc is the xsltproc executable. If xsltproc is not specified, and the variable XSLTPROC is set, the value of XSLTPROC will be used. Otherwise, xsltproc will be searched for in PATH.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

xsl:param

Values should have the form name=value

xsl:path

Sets an additional search path for xi:include elements.

catalog

A catalog file used to rewrite remote URL's to a local copy.

The xsltproc module provides the following rules. Note that these operate on jam targets and are intended to be used by another toolset, such as boostbook, rather than directly by users.

xslt
rule xslt ( target : source stylesheet : properties * )

Runs xsltproc to create a single output file.

xslt-dir
rule xslt-dir ( target : source stylesheet : properties * : dirname )

Runs xsltproc to create multiple outputs in a directory. dirname is unused, but exists for historical reasons. The output directory is determined from the target.

boostbook

To use boostbook, you first need to configure it using the following syntax:

using boostbook : [docbook-xsl-dir] : [docbook-dtd-dir] : [boostbook-dir] ;

docbook-xsl-dir is the DocBook XSL stylesheet directory. If not provided, we use DOCBOOK_XSL_DIR from the environment (if available) or look in standard locations. Otherwise, we let the XML processor load the stylesheets remotely.

docbook-dtd-dir is the DocBook DTD directory. If not provided, we use DOCBOOK_DTD_DIR From the environment (if available) or look in standard locations. Otherwise, we let the XML processor load the DTD remotely.

boostbook-dir is the BoostBook directory with the DTD and XSL subdirs.

The boostbook module depends on xsltproc. For pdf or ps output, it also depends on fop.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

format

Allowed values: html, xhtml, htmlhelp, onehtml, man, pdf, ps, docbook, fo, tests.

The format feature determines the type of output produced by the boostbook rule.

The boostbook module defines a rule for creating a target following the common syntax.

boostbook
rule boostbook ( target-name : sources * : requirements * : default-build * )

Creates a boostbook target.

doxygen

To use doxygen, you first need to configure it using the following syntax:

using doxygen : [name] ;

name is the doxygen command. If it is not specified, it will be found in the PATH.

The doxygen module depends on the boostbook module when generating BoostBook XML.

The following options can be provided, using <option-name>option-value syntax:

doxygen:param

All the values of doxygen:param are added to the doxyfile.

prefix

Specifies the common prefix of all headers when generating BoostBook XML. Everything before this will be stripped off.

reftitle

Specifies the title of the library-reference section, when generating BoostBook XML.

doxygen:xml-imagedir

When generating BoostBook XML, specifies the directory in which to place the images generated from LaTex formulae.

[Warning] Warning

The path is interpreted relative to the current working directory, not relative to the Jamfile. This is necessary to match the behavior of BoostBook.

The doxygen module defines a rule for creating a target following the common syntax.

doxygen
rule doxygen ( target : sources * : requirements * : default-build * : usage-requirements * )

Creates a doxygen target. If the target name ends with .html, then this will generate an html directory. Otherwise it will generate BoostBook XML.

quickbook

The quickbook module provides a generator to convert from Quickbook to BoostBook XML.

To use quickbook, you first need to configure it using the following syntax:

using quickbook : [command] ;

command is the quickbook executable. If it is not specified, Boost.Build will compile it from source. If it is unable to find the source it will search for a quickbook executable in PATH.

fop

The fop module provides generators to convert from XSL formatting objects to Postscript and PDF.

To use fop, you first need to configure it using the following syntax:

using fop : [fop-command] : [java-home] : [java] ;

fop-command is the command to run fop. If it is not specified, Boost.Build will search for it in PATH and FOP_HOME.

Either java-home or java can be used to specify where to find java.

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