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Struct template domain

boost::proto::domain — For use in defining domain tags to be used with proto::extends<>, BOOST_PROTO_EXTENDS() and BOOST_PROTO_DEFINE_OPERATORS(). A domain associates an expression type with a generator, and optionally a grammar. It may also have a super-domain. Expressions in a sub-domain are interoperable (i.e. can be combined freely with) expressions in a super-domain. Finally, domains control how non-Proto objects are turned into Proto expressions and how they are combined to form larger Proto expressions.

Synopsis

// In header: <boost/proto/domain.hpp>

template<typename Generator = proto::default_generator, 
         typename Grammar = proto::_, typename Super = unspecified> 
struct domain :  Generator {
  // types
  typedef Grammar   proto_grammar;     
  typedef Generator proto_generator;   
  typedef Super     proto_super_domain;

  // member classes/structs/unions

  // A callable unary MonomorphicFunctionObject that specifies how objects are
  // turned into Proto expressions in this domain. The resulting expression
  // object is suitable for storage in a local variable.
  template<typename T> 
  struct as_expr :  proto::callable {
    // types
    typedef see-below result_type;

    // public member functions
    result_type operator()(T &) const;
  };

  // A callable unary MonomorphicFunctionObject that specifies how objects are
  // turned into Proto expressions in this domain, for use in scenarios where
  // the resulting expression is intended to be made a child of another
  // expression.
  template<typename T> 
  struct as_child :  proto::callable {
    // types
    typedef see-below result_type;

    // public member functions
    result_type operator()(T &) const;
  };
};

Description

The Generator parameter determines how new expressions in the domain are post-processed. Typically, a generator wraps all new expressions in a wrapper that imparts domain-specific behaviors to expressions within its domain. (See proto::extends<>.)

The Grammar parameter determines whether a given expression is valid within the domain, and automatically disables any operator overloads which would cause an invalid expression to be created. By default, the Grammar parameter defaults to the wildcard, proto::_ , which makes all expressions valid within the domain.

The Super parameter declares the domain currently being defined to be a sub-domain of Super. An expression in a sub-domain can be freely combined with expressions in its super-domain (and its super-domain, etc.).

Example:

 template<typename Expr>
 struct MyExpr;

 struct MyGrammar
   : proto::or_< proto::terminal<_>, proto::plus<MyGrammar, MyGrammar> >
 {};

 // Define MyDomain, in which all expressions are
 // wrapped in MyExpr<> and only expressions that
 // conform to MyGrammar are allowed.
 struct MyDomain
   : proto::domain<proto::generator<MyExpr>, MyGrammar>
 {};

 // Use MyDomain to define MyExpr
 template<typename Expr>
 struct MyExpr
   : proto::extends<Expr, MyExpr<Expr>, MyDomain>
 {
     // ...
 };
            

The domain::as_expr<> and domain::as_child<> member templates define how non-Proto objects are turned into Proto terminals and how Proto expressions should be processed before they are combined to form larger expressions. They can be overridden in a derived domain for customization. See their descriptions to understand how Proto uses these two templates and what their default behavior is.


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